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Archive for July, 2010

This is your host Michael Feltz for today's segment

Welcome to U.S.-China Relations, this is Michael Feltz your host for today’s segment, along with Jeremy Ford and Catherine Hennessy. This segment is titled “Chinese Investors Enter the U.S”. Thank you for visiting us at http://www.sohnetwork.com Many Americans have concerns as to weather or not China will wield its holding of the U.S. National debt as collateral in a threat since China holds huge U.S. currency reserves. In May of 2010, U.S. officials, including Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, arrived in Beijing for talks on rebalancing the global economy. The purpose of these talks is to press China to allow the value of its currency to rise. Beijing, however, is intent on drawing attention to its other contributions to the global economy, including fast-rising outbound investments. Census.gov reported that as of April 2010, the current U.S. trade deficit was about $43 billion, while U.S. National Debt was around $13 trillion. Both of these are imposing and larger-than-life numbers, which will require numerous steps to balance out. Balancing importing and exporting is one of the steps. Currently, China is over-exporting manufacturing merchandise to the U.S. However, instead of importing goods from the U.S., China is trying to take a sidestep by making a spark of out-bound investment in America.

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A new crime wave stunned China recently. From March 23 to May 19, seven school killings across China were reported by news media. These pre-meditated crimes appeared to be random killings targeting innocent children.

The sudden outbreak of senseless crimes highlighted China’s already shaky security condition and growing social discontent, and prompted high profile official reactions.

What I’ve just read is the beginning an analysis titled, “Recent School Killings in China” from a website called chinascope.org, which is a unique media entity that gathers and periodically analyzes Chinese-language media reporting that is generally inaccessible to the West. This enables the the world to see the other side of the Chinese Government’s proverbial media blockade. China Scope is also very careful to site every single reference and source. This site often adds editorials to the beginnings of their reports and analyses.

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From Sound of Hope Radio Network, this is the Weekly Market Report:
Brought to you By Michael Feltz in BlueBand Studios of Lowell, MA.

In today’s market report… Asian stocks rose broadly Tuesday after flirting with multi-month lows, as markets such as Japan climbed from key support levels.

The yen’s rise again weighed on Japanese exporter shares, but the Japanese benchmark and firms such as Honda rebounded, taking heart from a bounce in Chinese shares.

Chinese banks and property shares led advancers after the easing of an IPO-related liquidity squeeze.

Subscriptions for the Hong Kong listing of Agricultural Bank of China close on Tuesday.

As expected, Australia’s central bank kept rates on hold at 4.5 percent.

The Reserve Bank echoed current sentiment about uneven growth rates, adding Chinese expansion was starting to moderate at sustainable levels.

The RBA also said commodity prices remained at very high levels, approaching peaks last seen two years ago.

Separately, mining giant Rio Tinto said the Australian government’s watered down mining tax is still among the highest in the world.

Rio said it would study the tax further before committing to any future expansion in iron ore projects.

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NEW YORK—China’s decision ahead of the G20 meetings to let the yuan currency appreciate against the dollar was a boon to global markets on Monday.

The move reverses the yuan’s peg to the dollar, instituted more than two years ago to protect China’s exporters during the global financial crisis. A stronger yuan could help curb inflationary pressure on the Chinese economy.

The yuan’s appreciation of more than 0.4 percent against the dollar on Monday is good news for U.S. and European exporters as foreign goods will become cheaper to both Chinese consumers as well as relative to Chinese exports in all major markets.

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Early culture from all lands embodies a wealth of rich folk-lores. Again, today’s simple but reflective idiom on Ancient Tales of Wisdom tells of a classic example as to how simple acts of kindness, and good deeds given from a noble and righteous heart will in way and time, always reward the selfless giver.
Greetings to you all, and welcome to today’s Ancient Tale of Wisdom. Hi, this is Laura Market back with you to share more great words from the wise. Today’s story is about the happening that gave rise to the Ancient Chinese idiom entitled: “Irrigating the Neighboring States Melon Fields.”
Before becoming a high-ranking official, Song Jiu was a magistrate of Bian County near the border of the Liang State. On the other side of the border was the Chu State. Both states grew melons, and the border patrols would check out each other’s melon harvests. The Liang State’s people were very diligent in farming and irrigated the melon fields frequently; therefore, their melons grew well. The Chu State’s people often dodged work and neglected tending and irrigating their melon fields. Consequently, their melons grew poorly.

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